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Fraggle Rock #2 / Power Rangers #28 Comic Reviews

Fraggle Rock: Journey to the Everspring #2 Where Archaia’s wonderful Power of the Dark Crystal and Labyrinth: Coronation comics tend to skew older in demographic, being best for teenagers and above, Fraggle Rock: Journey to the Everspring shows the publisher putting their best foot forward a

fraggle rock cover

Fraggle Rock: Journey to the Everspring #2

Where Archaia’s wonderful Power of the Dark Crystal and Labyrinth: Coronation comics tend to skew older in demographic, being best for teenagers and above, Fraggle Rock: Journey to the Everspring shows the publisher putting their best foot forward a more kid-friendly product in terms of storytelling, and a lighter comic tonally than the other Henson properties.

Kate Leth’s ability in giving the surprisingly robust cast of fraggles each a moment in the sun and a chance to display unique personality traits is the best part of the comic, and watching them interact is charming in a way that appeals to all age demographics. Leth turns the comic in surprising ways that range from heartwarming to adorable, with the final moment reveal of the doozers managing both at once.

 

Jake Myler’s art, while good in isolation, is less effective overall. Though the bright color choices and vibrant illustrations are no doubt the perfect choice for this comic, his use of color in backgrounds in particular often feels random. This, combined with the often claustrophobic panel composition makes some of the action hard to follow.

It’s the kind of comic kids are sure to love, and can still appeal to adults for whom Fraggle Rock undoubtedly holds a special place in their hearts, but it won’t win anybody over to the concept.

3 / 5

 

Power Rangers #28

If you had told me five years ago that one of the most interesting and bombastic comics of the year would wind up being Power Rangers, I would have assumed you had been huffing paint for a few weeks. But here we are. BOOM! Studios’ Power Rangers #28 continues what is proving to be the most explosive and epic comic since 2015’s Secret Wars. Seeing all of the different rangers from different continuities — and ultimately, different childhoods for readers — makes this feel like the comic equivalent of playing with action figures.

So what makes this crisis of infinite rangers so exciting?

In short, it’s that the entire creative team behind this comic is doing some of their best work. Writer Kyle Higgins is able to balance the scope of the fight scenes with the character moments with skill. With two rangers paired up, he’s able to show the essential traits that made these characters archetypes that were basically reincarnated every time a network from the 90’s or 00’s wanted to get some sweet Power Rangers money. Despite the obvious overlap, though, no two rangers feel like the same character. They all feel unique in terms of personality and history. The older Pink Ranger specifically has some heartbreaking dialogue about the subtle changes that result from time travel.

power rangers cover

In short, it’s a Power Rangers adults can unironically enjoy.

Artist Daniele Di Nicuolo and colorist Walter Baiamonti create what is probably the most visually exciting comic of the month. Panels never seem to ignore any aspect of their composition, as Di Nicuolo handles backgrounds and subjects with equal detail. Baiamont is able to make this a notably vibrant comic with an exceptionally diverse palette of colors. Despite this, the comic never seems visually assaulting or disjointed.

4.5 / 5

joey.edsall@newretrowave.com

Review overview

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